Section 106 Planning Obligations
© S106
“Modify or Discharge S106 Agreements”

Planning consultant

Paralegal s106 agreements

Planning obligations can cause problems with your development from the moment you speak to a planning officer, many local authorities have adopted policies which create a culture of “You want planning you must sign here”. The initial problem is knowing what the planners can and cannot do and once you have signed that legally binding contract you will have great difficulty overcoming the issues you will encounter that you may not have even considered.  You need to get advice before you submit a planning application.  Points of interest will be: Finding out what the planners want Offering what you can afford Negotiating the heads of terms Refusing to provide certain contribtions Being businesslike and assertive Knowing that a firm refusal to provide affordable housing isn’t a valid reason for the planners to refuse permission to develop a site Section 106 agreements have to meet several legal and policy tests, they also have to be enforceable and precise.

Annexe? Don’t think so

Many local authorities try to tie garden buildings to the main

house, here is a ridiculous example.

Government Initiatives

The government sees the need for much more new housing than is currently being built but Section 106 negotiations are holding up the system, particularly among self-build and small builders. They are minded to remove the burden for these developments. Don’t sign anything until you have presented your case as to the viability of the development.

Don’t sign that legal agreement without advice

Sign in haste, repent at leisure. Get a second opinio. Once you are committed the hard work is ahead of you if the proposals aren’t going to make you a profit.
S106.co.uk
© S106
“Modify or Discharge S106 Agreements”

Planning consultant

Paralegal s106 agreements

Planning obligations can cause problems with your development from the moment you speak to a planning officer, many local authorities have adopted policies which create a culture of “You want planning you must sign here”. The initial problem is knowing what the planners can and cannot do and once you have signed that legally binding contract you will have great difficulty overcoming the issues you will encounter that you may not have even considered.  You need to get advice before you submit a planning application.  Points of interest will be: Finding out what the planners want Offering what you can afford Negotiating the heads of terms Refusing to provide certain contribtions Being businesslike and assertive Knowing that a firm refusal to provide affordable housing isn’t a valid reason for the planners to refuse permission to develop a site Section 106 agreements have to meet several legal and policy tests, they also have to be enforceable and precise.

Annexe? Don’t think so

Many local authorities try to tie garden buildings to the main house,

here is a ridiculous example.

Government Initiatives

The government sees the need for much more new housing than is currently being built but Section 106 negotiations are holding up the system, particularly among self-build and small builders. They are minded to remove the burden for these developments. Don’t sign anything until you have presented your case as to the viability of the development.

Don’t sign that legal agreement without

advice

Sign in haste, repent at leisure. Get a second opinio. Once you are committed the hard work is ahead of you if the proposals aren’t going to make you a profit.